Helpful Information about DIR/Floortime

Clinician-Directed Therapy vs. Child-Directed Therapy Child-directed therapy (what is used during Floortime) ensures that the child is partaking in activities that interest him or her. The child will not view therapy as “work” because he or she will enjoy whatever he or she is working on. Clini read more

How to Administer DIR or Floortime Therapy (DIR/Floortime)

For your child of any age, there are three steps you should take while practicing Floortime. Floortime may be used in the home, but it is helpful to have assistance from a clinician (such as a speech-language pathologist), especially at the beginning of the program. 1. The first step you will want t read more

Karen George, Speech Pathologist in Chicago, Recommends Speech Buddies for Use During Speech Therapy!

I’d like to share a fun and useful tool I recent discovered that help children master sounds in a fun way. The tool is called Speech Buddies! Speech Buddies are a clinically-tested way for parents and speech-language pathologists (SLPs) to help children learn correct and consistent tongue position read more

Karen George, Chicago Speech Therapist, recommends Bumblebee Touchbook – An Entertaining and Educational App for Your Toddler

As a parent, you can transform your iPhone into a powerful resource for your children simply by downloading a few great apps to have handy for those situations at the grocery store, restaurant, or doctor’s office when a picture book or a stuffed animal just can’t keep your toddler’s attention read more

Articulation Station App for Ipad is recommended by Karen George and Chicago Speech Therapy

While there are several articulation apps available for speech-language pathologists to use on their iPhones or iPads, the new app Articulation Station is the clear choice for children’s speech therapists. I love this app and so does our team of speech-language pathologists at Chicago Speech Thera read more

How to Teach the P Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /p/ sound is a bilabial sound, meaning that it involves both lips being pressed together to create. Air is then released through the lips and slightly open teeth, creating the /p/ sound. Unlike the /b/ sound, which is made with the same mouth position, the /p/ sound is an unvoiced sound. The sou read more

How to Teach the M Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /m/ sound is a nasal sound, which means that all passage through the mouth is blocked and air instead has to travel through the nose. It is also a voiced (vs. unvoiced) sound, which requires the vibration of vocal cords. Closing your mouth and lips and using your voice to make a sound creates read more

How to Teach the H Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /h/ sound is one of the easier sounds to articulate. It does not involve any special arrangement of the lips or tongue or complicated movements. In order to produce the sound, simply open your mouth and breathe. The sound is unvoiced, which means that what you hear comes from the movement of t read more

How to Teach the N Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

Like the /m/ sound, the /n/ sound is a voiced, nasal sound. This means that the sound is created by the speaker vibrating their vocal cords while pushing air through their nose, or nasal cavity. The /n/ sound is distinguished from the /m/ sound by the placement of the speaker’s tongue. To make t read more

How to Teach the W Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /w/ sound is considered a glide or a semivowel sound by speech-language pathologists. In other words, /w/ sounds a lot like a vowel and sometimes even acts like one, even though it is technically a consonant. To make a /w/ sound, form a tight circle with puckered lips brought out and away from read more

How to Teach the B Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /b/ sound is a bilabial sounds, which means the lips are pressed together while producing the sound. It is also a voiced sound, which means that the vocal cords are vibrating when the breath is released from the lips. This is different than the unvoiced /p/ sound, for example, which gets its sou read more

How to Teach the K Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /k/ sound is very similar to the /g/ sound because they both use the same mouth position. Both are stop consonants, which means the airflow while producing the sound is first stopped, and then released. /K/ is different because it is an unvoiced sound – the only sound you hear when making it read more

How to Teach the G Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /g/ sound and the /k/ sound are very similar and use the same mouth position. So what makes them different? The /g/ sound is a voiced sound and the /k/ sound is unvoiced. That means that your vocal cords are vibrating as air is passed through the mouth to make the /g/ sound. Position the back o read more

How to Teach the D Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /d/ sound is made in almost the same way as the /t/ sound is made. Place the tip of your tongue on the little ridge on the roof of your mouth just behind your front teeth, then release the tounge, allowing air to rush through your mouth. The air is temporarily stopped by your tongue in this po read more

How to Teach the T Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /t/ sound and the /d/ sound are very similar because they are both made with the same positioning of the mouth. To say either sound, simply put the tip of your tongue on the small ridge just behind your teeth. Both sounds are stop consonants, which means that they are produced when air that is read more

How to Teach the NG Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /ng/ sound is a single, distinct consonant sound, even though it is spelled with two letters and sounds similar to /n/. Like the /n/ sound, /ng/ is a nasal sound. This means that the air passes through the nasal passage instead of through the mouth when making the sound. To make this sound, li read more

How to Teach the F Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

In order to make the /f/ sound, all that is required is to rest your front teeth lightly on your bottom lip and blow. The /f/ sound is a voiceless sound, so you are simply passing air through your mouth. You do not need to vibrate your vocal cords at all. Children usually master this sound by age read more

How to Teach the Y Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /y/ consonant sound is made by placing the tip of the tongue just behind the lower front teeth and raising the middle of the tongue towards the roof of the mouth. The sides of the tongue actually come in contact with the top of the mouth, but the middle of the tongue does not touch the roof, c read more

How to Teach the R Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /r/ sound is a particularly tricky letter to teach because the way your mouth produces the sound changes depending on the other letters it is combined with. In fact, there are 8 different vocalizations of the letter /r/: /ar/, /air/, /ear/, /ire/, /or/, /er/, /rl/, and the simple /r/ by itself read more

How to Teach the L Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /l/ sound is made by placing the tip of your tongue on your alveolar ridge, the small bump on the roof of your mouth just behind your front teeth. The sides of the tongue do not touch other parts of your mouth, and the air travels around your tongue to produce the sound. The /l/ sound is a voi read more

How to Teach the S Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /s/ sound is made by placing the tip of your tongue just behind the front teeth, very close to the roof of the mouth but not touching it. The sides of the tongue are raised to touch the roof of the mouth, leaving a passage for air down the middle of the tongue. The sides of the tongue should a read more

How to Teach the CH Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /ch/ sound is actually a combination of the /t/ and the /sh/ sound. To make the sound, begin with your teeth together and bring the tip of your tongue to the small ridge just behind the front teeth. The corners of the lips are puller together so the lips pucker. This is a voiceless stop conson read more

How to Teach the SH Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /sh/ sound is made by putting the teeth together and bringing the corners of the lips towards the middle, so the lips pucker like a kiss. The middle of the tongue comes up only slightly and barely touches the corners of the top teeth without touching the roof of the mouth. The front of the ton read more

How to Teach the Z Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /z/ sound uses the same mouth position as the /s/ sound, but the /z/ sound is voiced whereas the /s/ sound is unvoiced. This means that the passage of air through your mouth combines with the vibration of your vocal cords to create the sound. To position your mouth, place the tip of your tongu read more

How to Teach the J Sound by Chicago Speech Therapy

The /j/ sound is made with the exact same mouth positioning as the /ch/ sound, but the /j/ sound is voiced. This means that the sound is produced comes from both the vibration of the vocal cords and from the movement of air through the mouth. To make the sound, put your teeth together and pull the read more